Laboratory Simulation of an Iron(II)-rich Precambrian Marine Upwelling System to Explore the Growth of Photosynthetic Bacteria

dc.contributor.author Maisch, Markus
dc.contributor.author Wu, Wenfang
dc.contributor.author Kappler, Andreas
dc.contributor.author Swanner, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.department Geological and Atmospheric Sciences
dc.date 2018-11-17T15:42:03.000
dc.date.accessioned 2020-06-30T04:03:12Z
dc.date.available 2020-06-30T04:03:12Z
dc.date.copyright Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2016
dc.date.issued 2016-07-01
dc.description.abstract <p>A conventional concept for the deposition of some Precambrian Banded Iron Formations (BIF) proceeds on the assumption that ferrous iron [Fe(II)] upwelling from hydrothermal sources in the Precambrian ocean was oxidized by molecular oxygen [O2] produced by cyanobacteria. The oldest BIFs, deposited prior to the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) at about 2.4 billion years (Gy) ago, could have formed by direct oxidation of Fe(II) by anoxygenic photoferrotrophs under anoxic conditions. As a method for testing the geochemical and mineralogical patterns that develop under different biological scenarios, we designed a 40 cm long vertical flow-through column to simulate an anoxic Fe(II)-rich marine upwelling system representative of an ancient ocean on a lab scale. The cylinder was packed with a porous glass bead matrix to stabilize the geochemical gradients, and liquid samples for iron quantification could be taken throughout the water column. Dissolved oxygen was detected non-invasively via optodes from the outside. Results from biotic experiments that involved upwelling fluxes of Fe(II) from the bottom, a distinct light gradient from top, and cyanobacteria present in the water column, show clear evidence for the formation of Fe(III) mineral precipitates and development of a chemocline between Fe(II) and O2. This column allows us to test hypotheses for the formation of the BIFs by culturing cyanobacteria (and in the future photoferrotrophs) under simulated marine Precambrian conditions. Furthermore we hypothesize that our column concept allows for the simulation of various chemical and physical environments — including shallow marine or lacustrine sediments.</p>
dc.description.comments <p>This article is from <em>J. Vis. Exp.</em> (113), e54251, doi:<a href="http://dx.doi.org/10.3791/54251" target="_blank">10.3791/54251</a> (2016). Posted with permission.</p>
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.identifier archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/ge_at_pubs/121/
dc.identifier.articleid 1119
dc.identifier.contextkey 9257776
dc.identifier.s3bucket isulib-bepress-aws-west
dc.identifier.submissionpath ge_at_pubs/121
dc.identifier.uri https://dr.lib.iastate.edu/handle/20.500.12876/38050
dc.language.iso en
dc.source.bitstream archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/ge_at_pubs/121/2016_Maisch_LaboratorySimulation.pdf|||Fri Jan 14 19:12:48 UTC 2022
dc.source.uri 10.3791/54251
dc.subject.disciplines Biogeochemistry
dc.subject.keywords Environmental Sciences
dc.subject.keywords Issue 113
dc.subject.keywords Geomicrobiology
dc.subject.keywords Water column
dc.subject.keywords Fe(II) oxidation
dc.subject.keywords Photosynthesis
dc.subject.keywords Archean ocean
dc.subject.keywords Cyanobacteria
dc.subject.keywords Great Oxidation Event
dc.subject.keywords Banded Iron Formation
dc.title Laboratory Simulation of an Iron(II)-rich Precambrian Marine Upwelling System to Explore the Growth of Photosynthetic Bacteria
dc.type article
dc.type.genre article
dspace.entity.type Publication
relation.isAuthorOfPublication c3c07eb9-b790-40d2-b118-6e30a2c30900
relation.isOrgUnitOfPublication 29272786-4c4a-4d63-98d6-e7b6d6730c45
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