The resistivity and microstructure of heavily drawn Cu‐Nb alloys

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1989
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Verhoeven, J.
Downing, H.
Gibson, E.
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Materials Science and Engineering

The Department of Materials Science and Engineering teaches the composition, microstructure, and processing of materials as well as their properties, uses, and performance. These fields of research utilize technologies in metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, and electronic materials.

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The Department of Materials Science and Engineering was formed in 1975 from the merger of the Department of Ceramics Engineering and the Department of Metallurgical Engineering.

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1975-present

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A combined resistivitytransmission electron microscopy(TEM) study has been done on heavily drawn Cu‐20 vol % Nb alloys (so‐called i n s i t u alloys). The results show that electron scattering at Cu‐Nb interfaces makes the major contribution to resistivity in heavily drawn wire. The dislocation contribution is small and constant at deformation strains greater than around 4, apparently as a result of dynamic recovery/recrystallization of the Cu matrix which occurs during room‐temperature drawing. Results of this study and other recent TEM dislocation studies indicate that the dislocation density in heavily drawn Cu‐20 vol % Nb material does not exceed 101 1 cm 2. It is demonstrated here that the 101 3‐ cm 2 dislocation density predicted by the resistivity study of Karasek and Bevk [J. Appl. Phys. 5 2, 1370 (1981)] is high because the interface scattering contribution is more strongly reduced by coarsening than they assumed. It is shown that resistivitymeasurements provide a means of evaluating an average Cu channel diameter in the aligned composite alloys formed at large deformation strains.

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The following article appeared in Journal of Applied Physics 65, 1293 (1989); doi: 10.1063/1.343024 and may be found at doi: 10.1063/1.343024

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Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1989
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