Hydration of Portland cement with seawater toward concrete sustainability: Phase evolution and thermodynamic modelling

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2023-02-27
Authors
Li, Peiran
Li, Wengui
Zhou, John L.
Castel, Arnaud
Zhang, Shishun
Shah, Surendra P.
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Elsevier Ltd.
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Wang, Kejin
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Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering

The Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering seeks to apply knowledge of the laws, forces, and materials of nature to the construction, planning, design, and maintenance of public and private facilities. The Civil Engineering option focuses on transportation systems, bridges, roads, water systems and dams, pollution control, etc. The Construction Engineering option focuses on construction project engineering, design, management, etc.

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The Department of Civil Engineering was founded in 1889. In 1987 it changed its name to the Department of Civil and Construction Engineering. In 2003 it changed its name to the Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering.

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1889-present

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  • Department of Civil Engineering (1889-1987)
  • Department of Civil and Construction Engineering (1987-2003)
  • Department of Civil, Construction and Environmental Engineering (2003–present)

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Abstract
To mitigate the shortage of freshwater resources in the island and coastal regions, using seawater (SW) for concrete mix can provide significant economic and environmental benefits. To achieve a safe and reliable application, in-depth investigations are needed on hydration of Portland cement in SW. The composition of solid and liquid phases in hydrated Portland cement was quantitively determined and analysed in this study. The use of SW not only significantly increases the hydration rate of clinker but also affects the evolution of phase assemblage. Both the thermodynamic calculations and experimental determinations indicated the formation of Friedel's salt (FS) instead of sulfo-AFm in hydrated cement by SW, implying sulfate ions cannot compete with chloride ions to combine with AFm phases. The characteristic reaction in SW resulted in higher sulfate concentration, thus indirectly hindering ettringite (AFt) conversion at the late stage. Through the experimental quantification of thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis, the kinetic model of clinker dissolution was modified to be more suitable for the hydration of Portland cement in SW. The calculation from coupled models exhibits a valuable method to evaluate the evolution of phases in cement hydration. Through model calculations, 3.70% higher solid volume and 12.2% lower liquid volume were obtained in the cement-SW paste at the end of the hydration, which may cause the mechanical properties to be more sensitive to the environmental humidity and the temperature.
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This is a manuscript of an article published as Li, Peiran, Wengui Li, Kejin Wang, John L. Zhou, Arnaud Castel, Shishun Zhang, and Surendra P. Shah. "Hydration of Portland cement with seawater toward concrete sustainability: Phase evolution and thermodynamic modelling." Cement and Concrete Composites (2023): 105007. DOI: 10.1016/j.cemconcomp.2023.105007. Copyright 2023 Elsevier Ltd. Posted with permission.
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