Application of the rollermill and hammermill for biomass fractionation

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2007-01-01
Authors
Dilts, Mark
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Stuart J. Birrell
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Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Since 1905, the Department of Agricultural Engineering, now the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABE), has been a leader in providing engineering solutions to agricultural problems in the United States and the world. The department’s original mission was to mechanize agriculture. That mission has evolved to encompass a global view of the entire food production system–the wise management of natural resources in the production, processing, storage, handling, and use of food fiber and other biological products.

History
In 1905 Agricultural Engineering was recognized as a subdivision of the Department of Agronomy, and in 1907 it was recognized as a unique department. It was renamed the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering in 1990. The department merged with the Department of Industrial Education and Technology in 2004.

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1905–present

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  • Department of Agricultural Engineering (1907–1990)

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Abstract

Much research is being done to establish corn stover. Stover as an economical feedstock for ethanol and other industrial processes has many advantages including low cost, high production, and low competition. However; corn stover has disadvantages due mainly to its low density and heterogeneous make-up. Research was performed to evaluate and compare a hammermill versus a rollermill as two grinding methods to reduce particle size and change chemical distribution. The hammermill generated finer particles of a relatively homogenous nature, while the rollermill generated a broader particle size spread with differences in chemical composition for the different sizes. The rollermill created a 1% shift in lignin content, a 2% shift in ash content, an 8% shift in Hemicellulose content, and a 4% shift in cellulose content compared to the untreated control.

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Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2007