A method for classifying attack implementations based upon its primary objective

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2004-01-01
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Ryon, Luke
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Electrical and Computer Engineering

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECpE) contains two focuses. The focus on Electrical Engineering teaches students in the fields of control systems, electromagnetics and non-destructive evaluation, microelectronics, electric power & energy systems, and the like. The Computer Engineering focus teaches in the fields of software systems, embedded systems, networking, information security, computer architecture, etc.

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The Department of Electrical Engineering was formed in 1909 from the division of the Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering. In 1985 its name changed to Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering. In 1995 it became the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

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1909-present

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  • Department of Electrical Engineering (1909-1985)
  • Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering (1985-1995)

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A method for classifying attack implementations is a valuable structure for understanding attack implementations. An attack implementation is a specific way that an act, regardless of success, with the intention of causing harm or violating an explicit or implied security policy is done. The current state of computer security is that new attack implementations are being developed daily. Correspondingly, it is important for computer security professionals to be able to understand these attack implementations in order to develop more effective defenses. A method for classifying attack implementations will provide the basis for professionals to be able to develop attack implementation databases and to systematically study attack implementations. Each of these applications can be used to more fully understand attack implementations. A method for classifying attack implementations must be simple, unambiguous, comprehensive, and repeatable. These characteristics allow this method to be used in many different situations. A method for classifying attack implementations was developed that is based upon the primary objective of the attack implementation. Every attack implementation has exactly one primary objective. Correspondingly, a primary objective can be used to classify an attack implementation. A review of the possible resources of attack implementations was performed as part of an evaluation of this method for classifying attack implementations. This method for classifying attack implementations satisfies each of the four characteristics: simple, unambiguous, comprehensive, and repeatable. The method for classifying attack implementations presented in this research provides a valuable structure for studying attack implementations. This understanding will encourage future research and the development of methods for defending against computer attacks.

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Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2004