To Label or Not to Label, That is the Question

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Date
1999-10-01
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Moschini, Giancarlo
Distinguished Professor
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Economics

The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 to teach economic theory as a truth of industrial life, and was very much concerned with applying economics to business and industry, particularly agriculture. Between 1910 and 1967 it showed the growing influence of other social studies, such as sociology, history, and political science. Today it encompasses the majors of Agricultural Business (preparing for agricultural finance and management), Business Economics, and Economics (for advanced studies in business or economics or for careers in financing, management, insurance, etc).

History
The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 under the Division of Industrial Science (later College of Liberal Arts and Sciences); it became co-directed by the Division of Agriculture in 1919. In 1910 it became the Department of Economics and Political Science. In 1913 it became the Department of Applied Economics and Social Science; in 1924 it became the Department of Economics, History, and Sociology; in 1931 it became the Department of Economics and Sociology. In 1967 it became the Department of Economics, and in 2007 it became co-directed by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Business.

Dates of Existence
1898–present

Historical Names

  • Department of Economic Science (1898–1910)
  • Department of Economics and Political Science (1910-1913)
  • Department of Applied Economics and Social Science (1913–1924)
  • Department of Economics, History and Sociology (1924–1931)
  • Department of Economics and Sociology (1931–1967)

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Abstract

Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) have been welcomed by US agriculture and by a number of other countries (notably Canada and Argentina). Transgenic crops were virtually unkn own before 1996 but have experienced breathtaking adoption rates. For example, in 1999 more than 50 percent of the soybean crop grown in the United States is genetically modified (at least -+0 percent of U.S. com and 50 per cent of U.S. cotton are also transgenic). For the next crop yea r, it is estimated that 100 percent of the soybeans grown in Argentina will be herbicide resistant. But GMOs have struck a different cord in Eu rope, where they have met with numerous obstacles from consumers, businesses, policy makers and regulators.

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This is an article from Iowa Soybean Review 11 (1999): 16. Posted with permission.

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Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1999
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