Electrochemical detection methods for biologically-active molecules

Thumbnail Image
Date
1988
Authors
Welch, Lawrence
Major Professor
Advisor
Dennis C. Johnson
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Altmetrics
Authors
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Organizational Unit
Chemistry

The Department of Chemistry seeks to provide students with a foundation in the fundamentals and application of chemical theories and processes of the lab. Thus prepared they me pursue careers as teachers, industry supervisors, or research chemists in a variety of domains (governmental, academic, etc).

History
The Department of Chemistry was founded in 1880.

Dates of Existence
1880-present

Related Units

Journal Issue
Is Version Of
Versions
Series
Department
Abstract

Pulsed Amperometric Detection (PAD) has proven to be applicable to the determination of a number of organic compounds. One difficulty has been calibration of PAD for quantitative analysis over a wide concentration range. By pairing PAD in series with Conductivity Detection (CD), a much wider linear calibration range was found for carbohydrates and amino acids. Both compound groups were separated via anion-exchange chromatography and detected at Au electrodes;In an attempt to decrease amino acid detection limits, phenylthiohydantoin and methylthiohydantoin derivatives were examined. PAD was found to be more sensitive to these derivatives than the free amino acids. DC amperometry was also applicable to the thiohydantoin derivatives, with no instability or sensitivity loss with time observed. Detection limits as low as two picomoles were determined. Employment of a commercially available C-18 column allowed separation of nearly all amino acids using gradient elution liquid chromatography;Improvement in detection of underivatized amino acids was made by applying Pulsed Coulometric Detection (PCD) and Indirect Coulometric Adsorption Detection (ICAD). Both could be used following separation on anion-exchange columns. PCD was coupled with a glass reference electrode to allow anion-exchange separation of amino acids using gradient elution, and baseline perturbation during the gradient was minimal. Up to 20 amino acids were separated in less than one hour.

Comments
Description
Keywords
Citation
Source
Subject Categories
Copyright
Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1988