Prospects for Developing L2 Students’ Effective Use of Vocabulary Learning-Strategies via Web-Based Training

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2009-01-01
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Ranalli, Jim
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English

The Department of English seeks to provide all university students with the skills of effective communication and critical thinking, as well as imparting knowledge of literature, creative writing, linguistics, speech and technical communication to students within and outside of the department.

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The Department of English and Speech was formed in 1939 from the merger of the Department of English and the Department of Public Speaking. In 1971 its name changed to the Department of English.

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1939-present

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  • Department of English and Speech (1939-1971)

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Abstract

A large body of research supports the efficacy of learning strategies employed in the acquisition of second language vocabulary. However, research also indicates that many such strategies are underused or misused by learners and, further, that any effort to integrate learner training in the use of such strategies into classroom instruction faces a number of challenges, among them a shortage of appropriate training materials, a lack of expertise on the part of the teacher, and ingrained habits or even resistance on the part of the learner. This paper describes a classroom-based investigation into the utility of a prototype web-based learner-training resource called The Virtual Vocabulary Trainer (The VVT Site), which combines multimedia tutorials, practice exercises, and awareness-raising tasks. Participants’ use of the site and their opinions about the training they received were investigated by way of a survey, interviews, observations, and screen-capture devices. The results provide insights into the benefits that might be gained from an online multimedia approach to learner training, as well as useful design and content considerations for future enhancements to the site.

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This is an article from CALICO Journal 27 (2009): 161. Posted with permission.

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Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2009
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