First Observation of Low Temperature Magnetic Transition in CuAgSe

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2018-08-01
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Han, Chao
Ding, Qingping
Zhang, Lijuan
Li, Weijie
Wang, Jianli
Gu, Qinfen
Sun, Qiao
Furukawa, Yuji
Dou, Shi Xue
Cheng, Zhenxiang
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Ames National Laboratory

Ames National Laboratory is a government-owned, contractor-operated national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), operated by and located on the campus of Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa.

For more than 70 years, the Ames National Laboratory has successfully partnered with Iowa State University, and is unique among the 17 DOE laboratories in that it is physically located on the campus of a major research university. Many of the scientists and administrators at the Laboratory also hold faculty positions at the University and the Laboratory has access to both undergraduate and graduate student talent.

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Physics and Astronomy
Physics and astronomy are basic natural sciences which attempt to describe and provide an understanding of both our world and our universe. Physics serves as the underpinning of many different disciplines including the other natural sciences and technological areas.
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Abstract

In this Article, the temperature-dependent magnetic properties of CuAgSe pellet sintered from surfactant-free CuAgSe nanoparticles synthesized by a wet chemistry method were investigated in the temperature range of 4–300 K. A magnetic transition between diamagnetism and weak ferromagnetism is observed at around 60–70 K. The results from magnetic measurements under different machines/magnetic fields, room-temperature X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and temperature-dependent nuclear magnetic resonance all demonstrate that this magnetic transition is an intrinsic property rather than an effect of impurities. Combining these results with temperature-dependent neutron diffraction, the origin of the weak ferromagnetism is ascribed to a structural crossover-induced canted antiferromagnetism and possible deviation of Cu valence. The transition is strongly dependent on the sintering temperature and pressure, which could induce the structural phase transition.

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