Identification of candidate genes involved in early iron deficiency chlorosis signaling in soybean (Glycine max) roots and leaves

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2014-01-01
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Moran-Lauter, Adrienne
Peiffer, Gregory
Yin, Tengfei
Cook, Dianne
Shoemaker, Randy
Graham, Michelle
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Whitham, Steven
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Plant Pathology and Microbiology
The Department of Plant Pathology and Microbiology and the Department of Entomology officially merged as of September 1, 2022. The new department is known as the Department of Plant Pathology, Entomology, and Microbiology (PPEM). The overall mission of the Department is to benefit society through research, teaching, and extension activities that improve pest management and prevent disease. Collectively, the Department consists of about 100 faculty, staff, and students who are engaged in research, teaching, and extension activities that are central to the mission of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. The Department possesses state-of-the-art research and teaching facilities in the Advanced Research and Teaching Building and in Science II. In addition, research and extension activities are performed off-campus at the Field Extension Education Laboratory, the Horticulture Station, the Agriculture Engineering/Agronomy Farm, and several Research and Demonstration Farms located around the state. Furthermore, the Department houses the Plant and Insect Diagnostic Clinic, the Iowa Soybean Research Center, the Insect Zoo, and BugGuide. Several USDA-ARS scientists are also affiliated with the Department.
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Agronomy

The Department of Agronomy seeks to teach the study of the farm-field, its crops, and its science and management. It originally consisted of three sub-departments to do this: Soils, Farm-Crops, and Agricultural Engineering (which became its own department in 1907). Today, the department teaches crop sciences and breeding, soil sciences, meteorology, agroecology, and biotechnology.

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The Department of Agronomy was formed in 1902. From 1917 to 1935 it was known as the Department of Farm Crops and Soils.

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1902–present

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  • Department of Farm Crops and Soils (1917–1935)

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Abstract

Background

Iron is an essential micronutrient for all living things, required in plants for photosynthesis, respiration and metabolism. A lack of bioavailable iron in soil leads to iron deficiency chlorosis (IDC), causing a reduction in photosynthesis and interveinal yellowing of leaves. Soybeans (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) grown in high pH soils often suffer from IDC, resulting in substantial yield losses. Iron efficient soybean cultivars maintain photosynthesis and have higher yields under IDC-promoting conditions than inefficient cultivars.

Results

To capture signaling between roots and leaves and identify genes acting early in the iron efficient cultivar Clark, we conducted a RNA-Seq study at one and six hours after replacing iron sufficient hydroponic media (100 μM iron(III) nitrate nonahydrate) with iron deficient media (50 μM iron(III) nitrate nonahydrate). At one hour of iron stress, few genes were differentially expressed in leaves but many were already changing expression in roots. By six hours, more genes were differentially expressed in the leaves, and a massive shift was observed in the direction of gene expression in both roots and leaves. Further, there was little overlap in differentially expressed genes identified in each tissue and time point.

Conclusions

Genes involved in hormone signaling, regulation of DNA replication and iron uptake utilization are key aspects of the early iron-efficiency response. We observed dynamic gene expression differences between roots and leaves, suggesting the involvement of many transcription factors in eliciting rapid changes in gene expression. In roots, genes involved iron uptake and development of Casparian strips were induced one hour after iron stress. In leaves, genes involved in DNA replication and sugar signaling responded to iron deficiency. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and signaling components identified here represent new targets for soybean improvement.

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This article is from BMC Genomics 15 (2014): 1, doi:10.1186/1471-2164-15-702. Posted with permission.

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Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2014
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