Use of seed treatments and inoculants in no-tillage soybean production practices

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2009-01-01
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Osenga, Joseph
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Palle Pedersen
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Agronomy

The Department of Agronomy seeks to teach the study of the farm-field, its crops, and its science and management. It originally consisted of three sub-departments to do this: Soils, Farm-Crops, and Agricultural Engineering (which became its own department in 1907). Today, the department teaches crop sciences and breeding, soil sciences, meteorology, agroecology, and biotechnology.

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The Department of Agronomy was formed in 1902. From 1917 to 1935 it was known as the Department of Farm Crops and Soils.

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1902–present

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  • Department of Farm Crops and Soils (1917–1935)

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Soybean producers using no-tillage practices in the Upper Midwest encounter cooler, wetter soil conditions early in the growing season that slow crop growth and favor damping-off pathogens. The goal of this thesis work was to evaluate the use of soybean seed treatments and inoculants in no-tillage compared to conventional tillage practices in Iowa. The research reported in this thesis is divided into three specific objectives. The first objective was to evaluate the use of soybean seed treatments and inoculants in no-tillage and conventional tillage across Iowa. It was concluded that there was no evidence that the use of seed treatments and inoculants should change when using no-tillage practices for soybean production in Iowa. The second objective was to evaluate the use of seed treatments with various seeding rates in conventional and no-tillage systems. It was concluded that there was no evidence that seed treatments affect the optimum seeding rate in no-tillage or conventional tillage. The final objective examined the patented growth enhancing effect from the insecticide seed treatment, thiamethoxam, and whether this product could counteract slow early-season soybean growth observed in no-tillage. It was concluded that there was no evidence that the appearance of enhanced early-season growth from thiamethoxam is influenced by tillage or water stress under the conditions present in our studies.

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Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2009