Daily Cleaning Options for Sloped Manure Pits in Swine Finishing

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2009-06-01
Authors
Strobel, Brian
Oertwig, Terry
Paulsen, Brian
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Harmon, Jay
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Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Since 1905, the Department of Agricultural Engineering, now the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABE), has been a leader in providing engineering solutions to agricultural problems in the United States and the world. The department’s original mission was to mechanize agriculture. That mission has evolved to encompass a global view of the entire food production system–the wise management of natural resources in the production, processing, storage, handling, and use of food fiber and other biological products.

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In 1905 Agricultural Engineering was recognized as a subdivision of the Department of Agronomy, and in 1907 it was recognized as a unique department. It was renamed the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering in 1990. The department merged with the Department of Industrial Education and Technology in 2004.

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1905–present

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  • Department of Agricultural Engineering (1907–1990)

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Abstract

Two technologies were evaluated for daily manure removal in shallow, sloped pits in swine finishing facilities. The criteria included cleaning ability, initial cost, and water usage. One system selected for the trial was mechanical and one was liquid-based. Preliminary results of the scraper system have shown clean pit floor and side walls. The frequency of scraping has been reduced to several times per day and twice after a weekend. Challenges of the system include cleaning the front 0.45 m (18”) along the wall and using water to assist the drainage of manure. Results of the tip tank have shown a 4 gallon per pig recycle water usage per day. Flushability of the solids and development of sufficient head were factors in this 3 design. Both systems were automated to lessen human intervention and designed to allow the recycle pumps to be shut down at night.

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This is an ASABE Meeting Presentation, Paper No. 096307.

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Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2009