Soil depletion and water quality: a case study in the conjunctive management of natural resources

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1981
Authors
Shortle, James
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Economics

The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 to teach economic theory as a truth of industrial life, and was very much concerned with applying economics to business and industry, particularly agriculture. Between 1910 and 1967 it showed the growing influence of other social studies, such as sociology, history, and political science. Today it encompasses the majors of Agricultural Business (preparing for agricultural finance and management), Business Economics, and Economics (for advanced studies in business or economics or for careers in financing, management, insurance, etc).

History
The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 under the Division of Industrial Science (later College of Liberal Arts and Sciences); it became co-directed by the Division of Agriculture in 1919. In 1910 it became the Department of Economics and Political Science. In 1913 it became the Department of Applied Economics and Social Science; in 1924 it became the Department of Economics, History, and Sociology; in 1931 it became the Department of Economics and Sociology. In 1967 it became the Department of Economics, and in 2007 it became co-directed by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Business.

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1898–present

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  • Department of Economic Science (1898–1910)
  • Department of Economics and Political Science (1910-1913)
  • Department of Applied Economics and Social Science (1913–1924)
  • Department of Economics, History and Sociology (1924–1931)
  • Department of Economics and Sociology (1931–1967)

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Abstract

Conceptual models of crop production are developed to demonstrate the applicability of the theory of natural resource extraction to the economic analysis of cropland erosion and to draw upon this theory and the theory of environmental quality to consider economic issues in cropland erosion and erosion control for water quality improvement. Based upon the conceptual analysis, a multi-period model of cropland production in a small Iowa watershed is developed to consider these same issues quantitatively. The results demonstrate the importance of dynamic analysis in the investigation of issues in cropland erosion control and provide an economic basis for choosing alternative mixes of policy measures to obtain efficient control of cropland erosion. Damage cost estimates are also developed to allow some consideration of the social gains from erosion control. Based on these, it is demonstrated that some net social gains are to be expected when erosion control is obtained by highly efficient control strategies.

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Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1981