Getting to “Why?”

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2005-10-14
Authors
Palermo, Gregory
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Architecture

The Department offers a five-year program leading to the Bachelor of Architecture degree. The program provides opportunities for general education as well as preparation for professional practice and/or graduate study.

The Department of Architecture offers two graduate degrees in architecture: a three-year accredited professional degree (MArch) and a two-semester to three-semester research degree (MS in Arch). Double-degree programs are currently offered with the Department of Community and Regional Planning (MArch/MCRP) and the College of Business (MArch/MBA).

History
The Department of Architecture was established in 1914 as the Department of Structural Design in the College of Engineering. The name of the department was changed to the Department of Architectural Engineering in 1918. In 1945, the name was changed to the Department of Architecture and Architectural Engineering. In 1967, the name was changed to the Department of Architecture and formed part of the Design Center. In 1978, the department became part of the College of Design.

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1914–present

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  • Department of Structural Design (1914–1918)
  • Department of Architectural Engineering (1918–1945)
  • Department of Architecture and Architectural Engineering (1945–1967)

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Abstract

This is a case study of the development of a learning outcomes centered, large lecture, introductory design theory course, and a best practices presentation of active learning exercises aimed at getting to ‘Why?’ from ‘What?’. Getting to ‘Why?’ is a principal objective for me in large-lecture undergraduate education. In 1996 and 2003 I participated in developing required foundation theory courses for architecture and design averaging 220-260 students per section. Central to both are active learning exercises for analyzing the concrete ‘Who, what, where and when?’ to discern a ‘Why?’. This paper addresses the importance of ‘Why?’, and the learning outcomes, syllabus, exercises and student work of the newer course.

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This is a proceedings pushlished as Palermo,G.; Commitment, Community and Collaboration: International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (IS-SOTL) 2nd Annual Conference, Vancouver, British Columbia, October 14-16, 2005. Posted with permission.

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Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2005