Parameterized Aspect Calculus: A Core Calculus for the Direct Study of Aspect-Oriented Languages

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2003-11-01
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Clifton, Curtis
Leavens, Gary
Wand, Mitchell
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Computer Science

Computer Science—the theory, representation, processing, communication and use of information—is fundamentally transforming every aspect of human endeavor. The Department of Computer Science at Iowa State University advances computational and information sciences through; 1. educational and research programs within and beyond the university; 2. active engagement to help define national and international research, and 3. educational agendas, and sustained commitment to graduating leaders for academia, industry and government.

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The Computer Science Department was officially established in 1969, with Robert Stewart serving as the founding Department Chair. Faculty were composed of joint appointments with Mathematics, Statistics, and Electrical Engineering. In 1969, the building which now houses the Computer Science department, then simply called the Computer Science building, was completed. Later it was named Atanasoff Hall. Throughout the 1980s to present, the department expanded and developed its teaching and research agendas to cover many areas of computing.

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1969-present

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Formal study of aspect-oriented languages is difficult because current theoretical models provide a range of features that is too limited and rely on encodings using lower-level abstractions, which involve a cumbersome level of indirection. We present a calculus, based on Abadi and Cardelli�s object calculus, that explicitly models a base language and a variety of point cut description languages. This explicit modeling makes clear the aspect-oriented features of the calculus by removing the indirection of some existing models. We demonstrate the generality of our calculus by presenting models for AspectJ�s open classes and advice, and HyperJ�s compositions, and sketching a model for DemeterJ�s adaptive methods.

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