Architecture in a Book

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2018-01-01
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Naegele, Daniel
Associate Professor Emeritus
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Architecture

The Department offers a five-year program leading to the Bachelor of Architecture degree. The program provides opportunities for general education as well as preparation for professional practice and/or graduate study.

The Department of Architecture offers two graduate degrees in architecture: a three-year accredited professional degree (MArch) and a two-semester to three-semester research degree (MS in Arch). Double-degree programs are currently offered with the Department of Community and Regional Planning (MArch/MCRP) and the College of Business (MArch/MBA).

History
The Department of Architecture was established in 1914 as the Department of Structural Design in the College of Engineering. The name of the department was changed to the Department of Architectural Engineering in 1918. In 1945, the name was changed to the Department of Architecture and Architectural Engineering. In 1967, the name was changed to the Department of Architecture and formed part of the Design Center. In 1978, the department became part of the College of Design.

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1914–present

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  • Department of Structural Design (1914–1918)
  • Department of Architectural Engineering (1918–1945)
  • Department of Architecture and Architectural Engineering (1945–1967)

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Abstract

In 1955, the year in which his renowned chapel at Ronchamp was completed, the Swiss-French architect, Le Corbusier—perhaps the most influential architect in the world at the time—drew a book for the Livres d’Artiste series produced by the famous publisher, Tériade. The series was begun in 1943 and featured books by Rouault, Bonnard, Laurens, Matisse, Picasso, Chagall, Léger, and Gris. Le Corbusier’s Le Poème de l’angle droit [1] was comprised of a poetic text written in a broad, cursive script and twenty full-page lithographs (32cm x 42cm). The lithographs were to be removed from the book and then assembled, according to Le Corbusier’s instructions, as a mural in the shape of a 3-meter high tree.

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This unpublished paper by Naegele, D.J. Architecture in a Book. 2018. Posted with permission.

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Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2018
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