A Study of Households in Iowa that Left the Food Stamp Program

Thumbnail Image
Date
2002-03-01
Authors
Garasky, Steven
Wessman, Cory
Major Professor
Advisor
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Authors
Person
Nusser, Sarah
Professor Emerita
Person
Jensen, Helen
Professor Emeritus
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Organizational Unit
Center for Agricultural and Rural Development

The Center for Agricultural and Rural Development (CARD) conducts innovative public policy and economic research on agricultural, environmental, and food issues. CARD uniquely combines academic excellence with engagement and anticipatory thinking to inform and benefit society.

CARD researchers develop and apply economic theory, quantitative methods, and interdisciplinary approaches to create relevant knowledge. Communication efforts target state and federal policymakers; the research community; agricultural, food, and environmental groups; individual decision-makers; and international audiences.

Journal Issue
Is Version Of
Versions
Series
Abstract

Iowa experienced sharp decreases in Food Stamp Program (FSP) enrollment in the last years of the 1990s. This period followed significant changes in social assistance programs in the state, the passage of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996, and a period of good economic conditions. Data collected in a 1999 survey conducted in Iowa provide information about the well-being of families that had participated in Iowa's Food Stamp Program in 1997, the time immediately following the introduction of the new regulations. Nearly 58 percent of those participating in the FSP in 1997 were not participating in the program when interviewed in 1999. Those who left the FSP in 1997 showed better economic and employment outcomes than did others. This was true for working age adults without dependents or a disability. Adults without dependents or a disability who remained in the FSP in 1997 showed evidence of the greatest hardships: they were most likely to have very low income, less contribution from earned income, and to have experienced food insecurity and hunger in the last year. Over one-half of all of the households in the survey had used private food assistance in the past year.

Comments
Description
Keywords
Citation
DOI
Source
Copyright
Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1991
Collections