The meaning of task role change in teams and its impact on teams: Exploring the diverse landscape of identity adaptation and identity lingering

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2023-08
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Pahng, Phoebe Haemin
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Summers, James K
Howe, Mike (Michael)
Wo, David (Xuhui)
Cross, Susan
Rosa, Jose
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Altmetrics
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Management
Abstract
This dissertation explores the impact of role change on the team elaboration process and team performance. The research question focuses on how role identity change, specifically through identity adaptation or identity lingering, influences flux in team elaboration and team performance. The study also examines the role of team political skill and time in shaping the relationship between role identity change, flux in elaboration, and team performance. Theoretical frameworks such as role theory, identity adaptation/lingering theory, and the punctuated equilibrium framework are utilized to gain a deeper understanding of the complexities surrounding roles, role identities, team processes, and team outcomes. The hypotheses formulated in this study were tested through an experimental design involving 78 four-person teams engaged in a networked simulation, with role change being manipulated. While the findings did not consistently support the hypotheses, the study offers important implications that warrant consideration. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are thoroughly discussed.
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