A multigenerational perspective on caregiver substance use, trauma, & child welfare involvement

Thumbnail Image
Date
2021-01-01
Authors
Denlinger, Melissa
Major Professor
Advisor
Cassandra Dorius
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Altmetrics
Authors
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Organizational Unit
Human Development and Family Studies

The Department of Human Development and Family Studies focuses on the interactions among individuals, families, and their resources and environments throughout their lifespans. It consists of three majors: Child, Adult, and Family Services (preparing students to work for agencies serving children, youth, adults, and families); Family Finance, Housing, and Policy (preparing students for work as financial counselors, insurance agents, loan-officers, lobbyists, policy experts, etc); and Early Childhood Education (preparing students to teach and work with young children and their families).

History


The Department of Human Development and Family Studies was formed in 1991 from the merger of the Department of Family Environment and the Department of Child Development.

Dates of Existence
1991-present

Related Units

  • College of Human Sciences (parent college)
  • Department of Child Development (predecessor)
  • Department of Family Environment (predecessor)

Journal Issue
Is Version Of
Versions
Series
Abstract

This dissertation examines patterns of substance use behavior and child welfare involvement through generational cycles. Additionally, parents’ experiences with child welfare involvement were explored emergently and thematic, findings are highlighted. The secondary data utilized for this paper were derived from an assessment of two-generational substance use collected in partnership with Iowa Department of Public Health, Department of Human Rights, and Iowa State University. Data were collected from 41 individuals via in-depth qualitative interviews regarding how substance use has impacted their lives. Interviews were coded utilizing a combination of ethnographic and phenomenological approaches. This paper concludes with practical implications for policymakers and future research opportunities.

Comments
Description
Keywords
Citation
Source
Copyright
Sat May 01 00:00:00 UTC 2021