Effect of transportation stress and feed withdrawal on the shedding on S. typhimurium by swine

Date
1997
Authors
Isaacson, R.
Firkins, L.
Zuckermann, F.
Weigel, R.
Dipietro, J.
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Abstract

Of the food borne pathogens, the United States Department of Agriculture has identified Salmonella to receive its highest priority (Davies, P., 1997). The consumption of pork products contaminated with Salmonella is a frequent cause of disease. Bryan (Bryan, 1988), for example, demonstrated, for example, that II % of Salmonella outbreaks were associated with the consumption of pork, while Bean and Griffin ( 1990) have described numerous outbreaks where pork was identified as the source of contamination. S. typhimurium is one of the leading causes of salmonellosis in man and is the second most commonly isolated serotype from swine (HargrettBean, Pavia, and Tauxe, 1988). Animals exposed to Salmonella generally become persistently colonized for the remainder of their lives and can serve as reservoirs to contaminate other animals and food products. In a study by Wood, eta/ (1989), it was shown that animals challenged with S. typhimurium continued to shed S. typhimurium until they reached market weight 28 weeks later. In that study, carrier animals were identified because they persistently shed low levels of the challenge organism.

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