Effect of vernalization on different varieties of soft red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

Date
2022-05
Authors
Daniel, Erica
Major Professor
Moore, Kenneth
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Goggi, A. Susana
Knapp, Allen
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Abstract
Soft red winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the most important staple grain crops globally. It is well known that wheat requires vernalization or a “chilling period” to reach its yield potential; however, there are numerous varieties of wheat, which are specifically selected to perform best in certain regions. Their performance under varying lengths of cold exposure is key to obtaining maximum yield. In this study are two well-known varieties of wheat, one suited for northern U.S. climates, while the other is more suited to mid to southern U.S. climates; those will be compared to four unknown experimental varieties to highlight similarities and differences. There are six treatment groups ranging from 0 – to 10 weeks of vernalization time. The objectives are to observe how varying vernalization times affect the rate at which wheat will reach the heading phase of development, compare the development of the known vs. the experimental varieties, and also compare how having no vernalization period affects development. Of all the treatment groups, the 6-week vernalization period resulted in the best performance for varieties C, D, Sy, and Viper, while A performed best with 8-weeks and B performed best at 4 weeks. Sy, A, and C appear to be better suited for northern climates, while Viper, B, and D appear as though they would perform better in southern climates. This experiment highlighted developmental similarities and differences and could be replicated for larger scale and more realistic growing environments.
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