Effects of goals and expectations on participation in adult vocational supplemental education programs

Date
1983
Authors
Kolner, Shirley
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Abstract

The problem under investigation in this research was the effects of goals and expectations on participation in adult vocational supplemental education programs. The study used Boshier's Education Participation Scale (EPS) to test Cross' model for understanding participation in adult education activities;The study was conducted on preregistrants in adult vocational supplemental education courses at Des Moines Area Community College during the 1982 fall quarter. Based upon participation, preregistrants were divided into three groups--persisters, nonpersisters, and nonparticipants. The preregistrants were asked to complete the EPS and a demographic data sheet;Analysis of variance was applied to the data to examine if persisters rate vocationally related goals higher than other reasons and if non-participants and nonpersisters rate vocational goals lower than the other reasons. A t-test was used to ascertain if persisters rated vocational goals for enrolling higher than persisters and nonpersisters. A Z-test of proportions was calculated to find out if enrollees have higher goal expectations than nonparticipants, if persisters have higher goal expectations than nonpersisters, and if persisters have higher goal expectations than nonparticipants. Regression techniques and chi-square were applied to the demographic data to examine the relationships of demographic variables and participation;The results showed that persisters, nonpersisters, and nonparticipants rated vocational goals higher than all but cognitive interest reasons and persisters did not rate vocational goals higher than nonpersisters or nonparticipants. Proportionately, persisters had higher goal expectations than nonpersisters; however, nonparticipants had higher goal expectations than nonpersisters. Demographics were found to be questionable predictors of enrollment. Income accounted for only 3 percent of the variance;This study paves the way for future research to test Cross' model for understanding participation in adult education activities. Further research needs to be conducted on nonparticipants and nonpersisters to see why they do not participate or complete when their goals and goal expectations are similar to persisters. A replication of this study also needs to be conducted to either confirm or refute the results.

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Professional studies in education, Education (Adult and extension education), Adult and extension education
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