An evaluation to determine if reading the mind in the eyes scores can be improved through training

Date
2022-04-28
Authors
Stonewall, Jacklin Hope
Ouverson, Kaitllyn M.
Helgerson, Andrina
Gilbert, Stephen
Dorneich, Michael
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Public Library of Science
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Psychology
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Aerospace Engineering
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Industrial and Manufacturing Systems EngineeringPsychologyVirtual Reality Applications CenterAerospace Engineering
Abstract
The Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET) has received attention due to its correlation with collective intelligence. If the RMET is a marker of collective intelligence, training to improve RMET could result in better teamwork, whether for human-human or human-AI (artificial intelligence) in composition. While training on related skills has proven effective in the literature, RMET training has not been studied. This research evaluates the development of RMET training, testing the impact of two training conditions (Naturalistic Training and Repeated RMET Practice) compared to a control. There were no significant differences in RMET scores due to training, but speed of response was positively correlated to RMET score for high-scoring participants. Both management professionals and AI creators looking to cultivate team skill through the application of the RMET may need to reconsider their tool selection.
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This article is published as Stonewall, Jacklin Hope, Kaitlyn M. Ouverson, Andrina Helgerson, Stephen B. Gilbert, and Michael C. Dorneich. "An evaluation to determine if reading the mind in the eyes scores can be improved through training." PloS One 17, no. 4 (2022): e0267579. DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0267579. Copyright 2022 Stonewall et al. Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0). Posted with permission.
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