Adoption and impacts at farm level in the USA

dc.contributor.author Huffman, Wallace
dc.contributor.author Huffman, Wallace
dc.contributor.department Economics
dc.date 2018-02-18T02:22:26.000
dc.date.accessioned 2020-06-30T02:13:39Z
dc.date.available 2020-06-30T02:13:39Z
dc.date.copyright Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2011
dc.date.embargo 2016-12-08
dc.date.issued 2012-01-01
dc.description.abstract <p>The GM field crop revolution started in the USA in 1996 as the first GM-corn, soybean and cotton varieties became available to farmers. Soybean, corn, and cotton varieties became available with genetically engineered herbicide tolerance (HT), and cotton and corn varieties became available that were engineered for insect resistance (IR) (Fernandez-Cornejo and McBride 2000, NRC 2010). Second generation GM traits of herbicide tolerance and insect resistance became available by 2000 for cotton, and for corn shortly thereafter. Third generation GM corn varieties became available to some farmers in 2010, and Monsanto has an eight transgene variety—three genes for above ground insect resistance, three for below ground insect resistance, and two for herbicide tolerance. IR varieties provide a biological alternative to chemical insecticide applications and provide a reduced pesticide load on the environment and lower risks to human health (NRC 2010). HT soybean, corn, and cotton provide more effective weed control than with earlier herbicides. The key herbicide in this process is Roundup, which is environmentally and human health friendly relative to earlier chemical herbicides used for weed control (NRC 2010). In contrast, GM-wheat varieties are not available to farmers. The primary reason is the negative image that GM wheat has in the export market.</p>
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.identifier archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/econ_reportspapers/18/
dc.identifier.articleid 1017
dc.identifier.contextkey 9454777
dc.identifier.s3bucket isulib-bepress-aws-west
dc.identifier.submissionpath econ_reportspapers/18
dc.identifier.uri https://dr.lib.iastate.edu/handle/20.500.12876/22580
dc.language.iso en
dc.relation.ispartofseries Report EU25265 EN
dc.source.bitstream archive/lib.dr.iastate.edu/econ_reportspapers/18/2012_Huffman_AdoptionImpact.pdf|||Fri Jan 14 21:34:11 UTC 2022
dc.subject.disciplines Agricultural and Resource Economics
dc.subject.disciplines Agricultural Economics
dc.subject.disciplines International Economics
dc.title Adoption and impacts at farm level in the USA
dc.type article
dc.type.genre report
dspace.entity.type Publication
relation.isAuthorOfPublication d9eff576-b4ca-4da5-942d-c21c96bcb303
relation.isOrgUnitOfPublication 4c5aa914-a84a-4951-ab5f-3f60f4b65b3d
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