Pathogenic bacteria and indicator organisms for anti-microbial resistance in pork meat at retail level in The Netherlands.

Date
2003-01-01
Authors
van der Zee, H.
Wit, B.
de Boer, E.
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Slaughter pigs and pork carcasses are often contaminated with pathogenic bacteria. Consequently raw meat on sale in retail stores may also contain these bacteria. In The Netherlands the calculated contribution by pigs to the relative occurrence of human salmonellosis in the period 1994-1998 was 25.2 % (van Pelt, 2001). Survey and monitoring data on the contamination of raw products with pathogens like Salmonella, Campylobacter, Listeria monocytogenes and Escherichia coli O157 are essential for making risk estimates, and the results of surveys carried out in 1990/2000 and 2002 are presented here. In 2002 also a surveillance of anti-microbial resistance among indicator bacteria (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecium/faecalis) isolated from pork meat was started. The results show that pork meat was contaminated with Salmonella in levels between 6.2 - 10.5 %, S. Typhimurium being the predominant serotype, and to a lesser extent with Campylobacter, Listeria and E. coli O157.

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