Effect of Stationary and Moving Defenders on the Biomechanics of the Cutting Movement

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2014-04-15
Authors
Harper, David
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Altmetrics
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Research Projects
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Kinesiology
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Abstract

An anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tear is a debilitating injury that occurs in tens of thousands of athletes per year, often requiring surgery and long stints of rehabilitation. A major sports movement that can cause an ACL tear is the noncontact, lateral cutting movement. Different variables associated with this movement have been shown to manipulate the stresses and body angles of the hip, knee and ankle joints. Some of these manipulations can lead to an increased risk of ACL injuries. One such variable, first tested by Mclean et al (2004), is the incorporation of a defender in front of the cutting participant. In our study, 10 participants performed the cutting movement at 45° at a controlled velocity under 4 different conditions: with no defender present, with a stationary defender present, with a defender moving slightly forward, and with a defender moving to the left. With the use of reflective markers, motion detecting video cameras and a force platform, kinetic and kinematic data were collected at the ankle, knee and hip joints. This data will determine if the presence of a defender increases the incidence of mechanisms that cause ACL injuries, particularly the knee valgus angle. Data is currently being processed.

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