Impacts of Temperatures on Biogas Production in Dairy Manure Anaerobic Digestion

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2012-10-01
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Pandey, Pramod
Soupir, Michelle
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Soupir, Michelle
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Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Since 1905, the Department of Agricultural Engineering, now the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABE), has been a leader in providing engineering solutions to agricultural problems in the United States and the world. The department’s original mission was to mechanize agriculture. That mission has evolved to encompass a global view of the entire food production system–the wise management of natural resources in the production, processing, storage, handling, and use of food fiber and other biological products.

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In 1905 Agricultural Engineering was recognized as a subdivision of the Department of Agronomy, and in 1907 it was recognized as a unique department. It was renamed the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering in 1990. The department merged with the Department of Industrial Education and Technology in 2004.

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1905–present

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  • Department of Agricultural Engineering (1907–1990)

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Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering
Abstract

Batch anaerobic digestion of dairy manure was performed at low (25ºC), mesophilic (37ºC), and thermophilic (52.5ºC) temperatures to determine the influences of temperatures on biogas production. The experiment was runfor 76, 40 and 29 days at 25, 37, and 52.5ºC, respectively. The biogas production was measured daily at each temperature. To estimate the solid reductions, we measured total solids (TS) andvolatile solids (VS) over time. The biogas production at 52.5ºCand 37ºC were 49 and 17 times higher than that at 25ºC. Over incubation periods, the TS reduction at 25, 37, and 52.5ºC were5.6, 57, 34%, respectively. The VS reductions were 127, 58.4, 42.5%, respectively. At 25 and 37 ºC, pH was reduced, while at52.5 ºC pH was increased. The Oxidation Reduction Potential (ORP) values at 37 and 52.5ºC were negative over the incubation period. But at 25ºC, however, the ORP values were positive after Day 19. Findings from this study are useful for enhancing anaerobic digesters’ performance.

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This article is from International Journal of Engineering and Technology 4 (2012): 629–631, doi:10.7763/IJET.2012.V4.448. Posted with permission.

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Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2012
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