Edema Disease Caused by a Clone of Escherichia coli O147

Date
2006-09-01
Authors
Helgerson, Amy
Sharma, Vijay
Cornick, Nancy
Dow, Amie
Schroeder, Regina
Post, Karen
Cornick, Nancy
Major Professor
Advisor
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Altmetrics
Authors
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Journal Issue
Series
Department
Veterinary Microbiology and Preventive Medicine
Abstract

Edema disease is a systemic disease of weaned pigs caused by host-adapted strains of Escherichia coli, most commonly belonging to serogroup O138, O139, or O141. In the late 1990s, E. coli O147 strains containing the virulence genes f18,sta, stb, and stx2 were recovered from outbreaks of edema disease in the United States. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to determine that the majority of these strains (34/43) were closely related to one another. Subsequent analysis by multilocus restriction typing confirmed the PFGE results and indicated that the cluster of edema disease strains were only distantly related to other E. coliO147 strains. Serogrouping of edema disease isolates from the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic laboratory recovered between 1996 and 2000 indicated that 42% belonged to serogroup O147. Our data suggest that these strains may be a common serotype of edema disease-causing E. coli in the United States.

Comments

This article is from Journal of Clinical Microbiology 44 (2006): 3074, doi:10.1128/JCM.00617-06.

Description
Keywords
Citation
DOI
Collections