Exploring Individuals' Moral Value Conflicts as a Result of Corporate Sustainability

Date
2016-11-09
Authors
LoMonaco-Benzing, Rachel
Ha-Brookshire, Jung
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Abstract

For a supply chain to be truly sustainable, all members must adhere to common sustainability principles that stem from an assumed moral responsibility held by a corporation (Ha-Brookshire, 2015). These beliefs can range between extremes along a morality spectrum, from perfect to imperfect duties. A similar morality spectrum is expected from individuals, with varying degrees of intensity for consumers' and employees' beliefs of moral responsibility. The study was designed to explore (a) if there are ranges in moral values that individuals perceive toward corporate sustainability and (b) if individuals experience moral value conflicts between their consumer and employee identities. To explore these research questions, the researchers conducted 9 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with textile and apparel professionals across the U.S. The results showed that there may be varying degrees of perceived moral values toward corporate sustainability along a spectrum and individuals may experience moral value conflicts between personal and employee identities.

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