Are You Connected Through Consumption? The Role of Hashtags in Political Consumption

dc.contributor.author Chung, Telin
dc.contributor.author Johnson, Olivia
dc.contributor.author Hall-Phillips, Adrienne
dc.contributor.author Chung, Telin
dc.contributor.author Cho, Hyojung
dc.contributor.department Apparel, Events and Hospitality Management
dc.contributor.other Apparel, Events and Hospitality Management
dc.date.accessioned 2022-05-11T15:20:09Z
dc.date.available 2022-05-11T15:20:09Z
dc.date.issued 2019-11-25
dc.description.abstract The debate surrounding protesting National Football League (NFL) games began with player Colin Kaepernick’s decision not to stand for the national anthem in response to increased police violence toward people of color in the United States. Public use of social media has cast players’ behavior of kneeling or sitting during the anthem into an international spotlight and led to individuals’ participation in political consumerism, including boycotting the NFL. The goal of this research is to examine the role of a hashtag in political consumerism through the lens of social impact theory and its relation to individuals’ consumption practices. Using social network and content analysis, this study examined a 4-day sample of tweets and accompanying hashtags that included #BoycottNFL during 9 days of the 2017 NFL season. Findings of this study suggest that the line between lifestyle and contentious political consumerism is blurred. Boycotting the NFL is contentious political consumerism, but it consists of lifestyle political consumerism through the individualized behavior of creating a tweet, which inadvertently is a part of collective action. Furthermore, the analysis indicated that accompanying hashtags demonstrated three types of political consumerism sentiment (i.e., political-, civic-, and consumption-related) that change the tone of a tweet, which may alienate actors who are focused on the consumption practices of the collective action. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
dc.description.comments This article is published as 2019 Johnson, O., Hall-Phillips, A., Chung, T.-L., & Cho, H. (2019). Are You Connected Through Consumption? The Role of Hashtags in Political Consumption. Social Media + Society https://doi.org/10.1177/2056305119883427.
dc.description.sponsorship This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 License (http://www.creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/) which permits non-commercial use, reproduction and distribution of the work without further permission provided the original work is attributed as specified on the SAGE and Open Access pages (https://us.sagepub.com/en-us/nam/open-access-at-sage).
dc.identifier.uri https://dr.lib.iastate.edu/handle/20.500.12876/Nr1VMlAz
dc.language.iso en
dc.publisher SAGE Publications
dc.source.uri https://doi.org/10.1177/2056305119883427 *
dc.subject.keywords political consumerism, social media, collective action
dc.title Are You Connected Through Consumption? The Role of Hashtags in Political Consumption
dc.type Article
dspace.entity.type Publication
relation.isAuthorOfPublication 02585803-32cb-4138-a948-4f215832aaf9
relation.isOrgUnitOfPublication 5960a20b-38e3-465c-a204-b47fdce6f6f2
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