Effect of temperature and nutrient concentration on the growth of six species of sooty blotch and flyspeck fungi

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2010-01-01
Authors
Batzer, Jean
Hernandez Rincon, Sandra
Mueller, Daren
Dixon, Philip
Petersen, Benjamin
Le Corronc, Fabien
McManus, Patricia
Dixon, Philip
Gleason, Mark
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Plant Pathology and MicrobiologyStatistics
Abstract

We assessed the effects of temperature and nutrient concentration on the growth of commonly occurring members of the sooty blotch and flyspeck (SBFS) complex in the Midwest United States. Radial growth in vitro of two isolates of each of six SBFS species (Dissoconium aciculare, Colletogloeum sp. FG2, Peltaster sp. P2, Sybren sp. CS1, Pseudocercosporella sp. RH1, and Peltaster fructicola) was measured at 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35°C for 7 weeks. Optimal growth for all six species occurred at 20 to 25°C, with slower growth at 10 and 15°C and little to no growth at 30 or 35°C. Differences in growth rate among species were evident at 10, 15, and 35°C. In a separate trial, the same isolates were incubated at 25°C in darkness on cellulose membrane (1214 kDa) placed on Noble agar that had been amended to obtain concentrations of 0%, 0.01%, 0.05% or 0.5% apple juice. After 3 weeks, colonies were digitally photographed and colony opacity was assessed. The presence and concentration of apple juice strongly impacted colony morphology as evidenced by changes in colony tone, and some species were more sensitive to changes in apple juice concentration than others. These findings are the first published evidence of differences among newly described SBFS species in response to temperature and nutrient concentration Response of tomato rootstocks with the Mi resistance gene to Meloidogyne incognita race 2 at different soil temperatures

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This is an article from Phytopathologia Mediterranea 49 (2010) 3, doi:10.14601/Phytopathol_Mediterr-3121. Posted with permission.

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