A qualitative study of how one building assistance team solves problems

Thumbnail Image
Date
2004-01-01
Authors
Kelly, Sarah
Major Professor
Advisor
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Altmetrics
Authors
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Journal Issue
Is Version Of
Versions
Series
Department
Education
Abstract

This research examines the nature of the problem-solving in one Midwestern, urban elementary school. Problem-solving is defined as a collaborative, seven-step process based on Gutkin and Curtis's (1990) research utilizing the most intensive intervention with the least possible intrusion to solve academic and behavioral classroom issues. The researcher used ethnographic methods to observe one building assistance team address one student case, then followed-up with interviews of team participants. The guiding questions for this research were: a) Do classroom teachers understand the nature of problem-solving? b) How do personal interaction skills of those involved affect the problem-solving process? c) Does the building assistance team use a discernable process? d) How does the team measure efficacy? e) What type of administrative support is available to classroom teachers and the building assistance team? and f) To what extent are parents involved in the problem-solving process? Data were analyzed using conversation analysis to make conclusions regarding personal interaction skills, systematic processes, participant roles, intervention implementation, accountability, and team efficacy.

Comments
Description
Keywords
Citation
Source
Copyright
Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2004