Anisotropic physical properties and pressure dependent magnetic ordering of CrAuTe4

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2016-11-01
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Jo, Na Hyun
Kaluarachchi, Udhara
Wu, Yun
Mou, Daixiang
Huang, Lunan
Taufour, Valentin
Kaminski, Adam
Bud’ko, Sergey
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Canfield, Paul
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Ames National Laboratory

Ames National Laboratory is a government-owned, contractor-operated national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), operated by and located on the campus of Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa.

For more than 70 years, the Ames National Laboratory has successfully partnered with Iowa State University, and is unique among the 17 DOE laboratories in that it is physically located on the campus of a major research university. Many of the scientists and administrators at the Laboratory also hold faculty positions at the University and the Laboratory has access to both undergraduate and graduate student talent.

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Systematic measurements of temperature-dependent magnetization, resistivity, and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) at ambient pressure as well as resistivity under pressures up to 5.25 GPa were conducted on single crystals of CrAuTe4. Magnetization data suggest that magnetic moments are aligned antiferromagnetically along the crystallographic c axis below TN=255 K. ARPES measurements show band reconstruction due to the magnetic ordering. Magnetoresistance data show clear anisotropy, and, at high fields, quantum oscillations. The Néel temperature decreases monotonically under pressure, decreasing to TN=236 K at 5.22 GPa. The pressure dependencies of (i) TN, (ii) the residual resistivity ratio, and (iii) the size and power-law behavior of the low-temperature magnetoresistance all show anomalies near 2 GPa suggesting that there may be a phase transition (structural, magnetic, and/or electronic) induced by pressure. For pressures higher than 2 GPa a significantly different quantum oscillation frequency emerges, consistent with a pressure induced change in the electronic states.

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