Participation as Reflective Practice: Digital Composing and Feminist Pedagogy

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Date
2019-03-01
Authors
Palmeri, Jason
Dubisar, Abby
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English

The Department of English seeks to provide all university students with the skills of effective communication and critical thinking, as well as imparting knowledge of literature, creative writing, linguistics, speech and technical communication to students within and outside of the department.

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The Department of English and Speech was formed in 1939 from the merger of the Department of English and the Department of Public Speaking. In 1971 its name changed to the Department of English.

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1939-present

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  • Department of English and Speech (1939-1971)

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Abstract

This chapter engages the intersection of two of Critel’s commonplaces of participation: technology and embodiment. It begins with the coauthors’ personal narratives that articulate how Critel’s research shifted their understandings of the obligatory participation requirement, which judges students’ embodied activities (such as spoken participation) in ways that can impede access for students. The chapter represents the coauthors’ collective attempt to keep engaged in a dialogue with Critel, articulating the diverse ways they have worked to radically refigure and/or abolish the participation requirement in favor of assessing digital informal composing both in and out of class. The coauthors then describe recent attempts to bring discussion and assessment of participation back into their classrooms in more reflective ways, ending with six key reflective practices instructors can use in their own classroom contexts to challenge sexist and ableist inequities in classroom participation. Ultimately, by drawing on digital, feminist and disability studies theories, this chapter suggests teachers should employ a diverse range of technologies to engage students in reflectively assessing which forms of participation best contribute to their learning as well as how they can best enable the participation of other students.

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This book chapter is published as Palmeri, Jason and Abby M. Dubisar. "Participation as Reflective Practice: Digital Composing and Feminist Pedagogy.” The Rhetoric of Participation: Interrogating Commonplaces in and Beyond the Classroom.” Eds. Paige Banaji, Lisa Blankenship, Katie DeLuca, and Lauren Obermark. Computers and Composition Digital Press, an imprint of Utah State University Press, 2019.

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Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2019
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