Indicator Bacteria in Subsurface Drain Water Following Swine Manure Application

Thumbnail Image
Date
2001-07-01
Authors
Warnemuende, E.
Baker, James
Lorimor, Jeffery
Melvin, Stewart
Major Professor
Advisor
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Authors
Person
Kanwar, Rameshwar
Distinguished Professor
Person
Mickelson, Steven
Professor and Special Advisor for Student Information Systems
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Organizational Unit
Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Since 1905, the Department of Agricultural Engineering, now the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABE), has been a leader in providing engineering solutions to agricultural problems in the United States and the world. The department’s original mission was to mechanize agriculture. That mission has evolved to encompass a global view of the entire food production system–the wise management of natural resources in the production, processing, storage, handling, and use of food fiber and other biological products.

History
In 1905 Agricultural Engineering was recognized as a subdivision of the Department of Agronomy, and in 1907 it was recognized as a unique department. It was renamed the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering in 1990. The department merged with the Department of Industrial Education and Technology in 2004.

Dates of Existence
1905–present

Historical Names

  • Department of Agricultural Engineering (1907–1990)

Related Units

Journal Issue
Is Version Of
Versions
Series
Abstract

Appropriate manure application rates, timing, and methods are necessary to maximize nutrient utilization by plants from manure, while minimizing water resource pollution potential, including that of enteric organisms. A field study and a soil column study examined the response of indicator bacterial densities in subsurface drain water to different swine manure applications. The field study focused on the impacts of different manure management regimes on fecal coliform, fecal streptococcus, and Escherichia coli (E. coli) densities in subsurface tile drain water. Eight swine manure treatments were compared with a control treatment where commercial urea ammonium nitrate was applied. Manure treatments included fall injection, spring injection, and late winter broadcast at application rates of 168 kg N/ha and 336 kg N/ha. Results indicated that the highest incidence of significantly elevated bacterial levels occurred where manure had been broadcast in late winter at a rate of 336 kg N/ha.

Comments
Description
Keywords
Citation
DOI
Source
Copyright
Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2001