Effects of an Acute Boxing Session on Muscle Activity in Persons with Parkinson’s Disease

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2022
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Meyer, Olivia
Brockshus, Brandon
Lair, Rebecca
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©2022 Stegemoller E, et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
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Stegemoller, Elizabeth
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Kinesiology
The Department of Kinesiology seeks to provide an ample knowledge of physical activity and active living to students both within and outside of the program; by providing knowledge of the role of movement and physical activity throughout the lifespan, it seeks to improve the lives of all members of the community. Its options for students enrolled in the department include: Athletic Training; Community and Public Health; Exercise Sciences; Pre-Health Professions; and Physical Education Teacher Licensure. The Department of Physical Education was founded in 1974 from the merger of the Department of Physical Education for Men and the Department of Physical Education for Women. In 1981 its name changed to the Department of Physical Education and Leisure Studies. In 1993 its name changed to the Department of Health and Human Performance. In 2007 its name changed to the Department of Kinesiology. Dates of Existence: 1974-present. Historical Names: Department of Physical Education (1974-1981), Department of Physical Education and Leisure Studies (1981-1993), Department of Health and Human Performance (1993-2007). Related Units: College of Human Sciences (parent college), College of Education (parent college, 1974 - 2005), Department of Physical Education for Women (predecessor) Department of Physical Education for Men
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Purpose: This study assessed the acute effects of a boxing session on upper extremity muscle activity in people with Parkinson’s Disease (PD). Materials and Methods: Electromyography was used to assess upper extremity muscle activity in ten people with PD, fourteen healthy older adults, and twelve healthy younger adults during elbow flexion and extension at fast and self-paced movement before and after an acute boxing session. Results: Results showed a significant difference in peak to offset time in the triceps brachii during fast movement (F(1)=8.181, p=0.009) and both peak amplitude (F(1)=4.587, p=0.042) in the triceps brachii and peak to offset time (F(1)=4.256, p=0.018) in the biceps brachii during self-paced movement from before to after the boxing session for all three groups. No differences between groups were revealed. Conclusions: Triceps brachii muscle activity improved after an acute session of boxing, regardless of age or disease. Thus, people with PD may show similar benefits from boxing as healthy populations. Additional research should be conducted to further determine the efficacy of long-term boxing programs for people with PD, as well as how changes in triceps brachii muscle activity relate to functional outcomes.
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This article is published as Stegemoller E, et al. Effects of an Acute Boxing Session on Muscle Activity in Persons with Parkinson’s Disease. J Neurol Neurophysiol. 2022, 13(4), 001-006. Posted with permission.
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