Policy Considerations Related to Further Intervention in the Farm Credit System

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1987
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Economics

The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 to teach economic theory as a truth of industrial life, and was very much concerned with applying economics to business and industry, particularly agriculture. Between 1910 and 1967 it showed the growing influence of other social studies, such as sociology, history, and political science. Today it encompasses the majors of Agricultural Business (preparing for agricultural finance and management), Business Economics, and Economics (for advanced studies in business or economics or for careers in financing, management, insurance, etc).

History
The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 under the Division of Industrial Science (later College of Liberal Arts and Sciences); it became co-directed by the Division of Agriculture in 1919. In 1910 it became the Department of Economics and Political Science. In 1913 it became the Department of Applied Economics and Social Science; in 1924 it became the Department of Economics, History, and Sociology; in 1931 it became the Department of Economics and Sociology. In 1967 it became the Department of Economics, and in 2007 it became co-directed by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Business.

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1898–present

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  • Department of Economic Science (1898–1910)
  • Department of Economics and Political Science (1910-1913)
  • Department of Applied Economics and Social Science (1913–1924)
  • Department of Economics, History and Sociology (1924–1931)
  • Department of Economics and Sociology (1931–1967)

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Abstract

The Farm Credit System Is a major participant in extending credit to and brokering losses from the agricultural sector during the current adjustment process. This article focuses on the problems faced by the system as a cooperative lender with relatively little diversity in its loan portfolio. Assistance to the system should be accompanied by organizational and structural changes that address the fundamental reasons for its vulnerability. Conditions suggest three basic choices: (1) preservation of the system in recognizable form, (2) decentralization to the district level, or (3) a shift toward a wholesaling function. One realistic alternative would involve a combination of these approaches.

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This article is from Journal of Agricultural Cooperation 2 (1987): 57–73. Posted with permission.

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Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1987
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