Effect of seed moisture content, seed composition, and testing media in soybean (Glycine max L.) germination tests

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2006-01-01
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LeVan, Nathan
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Agronomy

The Department of Agronomy seeks to teach the study of the farm-field, its crops, and its science and management. It originally consisted of three sub-departments to do this: Soils, Farm-Crops, and Agricultural Engineering (which became its own department in 1907). Today, the department teaches crop sciences and breeding, soil sciences, meteorology, agroecology, and biotechnology.

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The Department of Agronomy was formed in 1902. From 1917 to 1935 it was known as the Department of Farm Crops and Soils.

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1902–present

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  • Department of Farm Crops and Soils (1917–1935)

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Soybean (Glycine max L.) seed yield, composition, and quality can be negatively affected by environmental stresses during the growing season and harvest. The central hypothesis of this thesis is that soybean seed testing techniques, i.e. testing media, need to be adjusted for seed moisture content, production environment, and seed composition, as these factors alter the measured germination in laboratory tests. Water and nutrient deficit during pod filling usually lead to poor yields by reducing seed set, increasing seed abortion, and reducing seed size. While maturation drying and the acquisition of desiccation tolerance are critical physiological processes that help orthodox seeds (seeds from species that can be stored at low moisture content) survive periods of unfavorable conditions for germination, the warm and dry conditions during harvest can often over-dry seeds. Extremely dry seeds experience stresses during imbibition which are likely to result in imbibitional damage and seedling abnormalities. The production environment can also lead to composition differences within seeds and may play important roles in imbibitional injury. Being able to accurately evaluate seed germination will be crucial regardless of seed composition, production environment, and, inherent genetic differences. Seed analysts must consider soybean seed composition and seed moisture, and, their interaction with testing media to avoid inconsistent test results within and among seed testing laboratories.

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Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2006