Comparing the Influenza vs. COVID-19 Mortality Rates in 2019-2020

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2022-05
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Mohamed Arafa, Sherouk
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Bracha, Vlastislav
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Bracha , Vlastislav
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This review is meant to discuss mortality rates, how they are obtained, and what they mean in the context of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and influenza (flu). As the general definition of mortality is the measure of deaths in a certain population over a specific point in time, the mortalities of 2019-2020 in the United States are the ones to be analyzed. Influenza and COVID-19 are two similar diseases in terms of symptoms and spread; they are both capable of severely infecting those who are immunocompromised. The mortality rates of these illnesses are calculated based on similar data yet using different methods. As COVID-19 is an ongoing pandemic, the methods used are quite different and more dependent on raw data reporting. Whereas influenza mortality has an established system in place for annual mortality estimations. Factors which may skew the data used for reporting will be taken into consideration and discussed. From 2019 to 2020, influenza mortality estimation increased by 5.7% from 12.3 to 13.0 out of 100,000. In 2020, COVID-19 mortality was calculated to be 91.5 out of 100,000. These numbers alone may depict how COVID-19 is much more virulent in comparison to influenza. However, due to the difference in obtaining these mortality rates, is it a substantial conclusion to come to? This review will further investigate the methods in which mortality rates are found for both illnesses and whether they were comparable from 2019-2020.
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2022