Plant Recognition through the Fusion of 2D and 3D Images for Robotic Weeding

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2015-07-01
Authors
Gai, Jingyao
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Steward, Brian
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Tang, Lie
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Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Since 1905, the Department of Agricultural Engineering, now the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABE), has been a leader in providing engineering solutions to agricultural problems in the United States and the world. The department’s original mission was to mechanize agriculture. That mission has evolved to encompass a global view of the entire food production system–the wise management of natural resources in the production, processing, storage, handling, and use of food fiber and other biological products.

History
In 1905 Agricultural Engineering was recognized as a subdivision of the Department of Agronomy, and in 1907 it was recognized as a unique department. It was renamed the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering in 1990. The department merged with the Department of Industrial Education and Technology in 2004.

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1905–present

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  • Department of Agricultural Engineering (1907–1990)

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Abstract

In crop production systems, weed management is vitally important. But both manual weeding and herbicide-based weed controlling are problematic due to concerns in cost, operator health, emergence of herbicide-resistant weed species, and environment impact. Automated robotic weeding offers a possibility of controlling weeds in a precise fashion, particularly for weeds growing near crops or within crop rows. However, identification and localization of plants have not yet been fully automated. The goal of this reported project is to develop a high-throughput plant recognition and localization algorithm by fusing 2D color and textural data with 3D point cloud data. Plant morphological models were developed and applied for plant recognition against different weed species at different growth stages.

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This proceeding is from 2015 ASABE Annual International Meeting, Paper No. 152181371, pages 1-8 (doi: 10.13031/aim.20152181371). St. Joseph, Mich.: ASABE.

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Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2015