Incremental impact analysis for object-oriented software

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2004-01-01
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Bishop, Luke
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Electrical and Computer Engineering

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECpE) contains two focuses. The focus on Electrical Engineering teaches students in the fields of control systems, electromagnetics and non-destructive evaluation, microelectronics, electric power & energy systems, and the like. The Computer Engineering focus teaches in the fields of software systems, embedded systems, networking, information security, computer architecture, etc.

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The Department of Electrical Engineering was formed in 1909 from the division of the Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering. In 1985 its name changed to Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering. In 1995 it became the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

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1909-present

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  • Department of Electrical Engineering (1909-1985)
  • Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering (1985-1995)

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Software impact analysis is defined as calculating the set of locations in the software that may be affected given an initial set of proposed changes. Traditionally, there has been a precision vs. computation tradeoff when performing impact analysis. Higher precision methods of calculating impact such as static slicing based techniques are too computationally intensive to be practical for large software. Other techniques such as structural analysis require far less computation, but are less precise. We present an incremental approach with an objective to reduce the number of methods that must be analyzed in order to compute impact. We define a program dependency model as a part of impact analysis to facilitate the incremental approach. We present an implementation in the form of a plug-in for the popular Eclipse IDE. Experimental results show a significant performance gain over traditional static-slicing based techniques.

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Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2004