Professional Connections through the Technology Learning Community

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2007-04-01
Authors
Ancar, LeQuetia
Field, Dennis
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Freeman, Steven
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Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering

Since 1905, the Department of Agricultural Engineering, now the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering (ABE), has been a leader in providing engineering solutions to agricultural problems in the United States and the world. The department’s original mission was to mechanize agriculture. That mission has evolved to encompass a global view of the entire food production system–the wise management of natural resources in the production, processing, storage, handling, and use of food fiber and other biological products.

History
In 1905 Agricultural Engineering was recognized as a subdivision of the Department of Agronomy, and in 1907 it was recognized as a unique department. It was renamed the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering in 1990. The department merged with the Department of Industrial Education and Technology in 2004.

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1905–present

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  • Department of Agricultural Engineering (1907–1990)

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Abstract

Have you heard? The new buzzword is “learning communities.” A learning community is a relatively old phenomenon that has resurfaced; it is making educators at institutions of higher education stand up and take notice. According to Angelo (1997), learning communities have produced significant gains in student involvement, learning, satisfaction, social connectedness, persistence, and retention, thus creating a more holistic and favorable educational experience. Grounded in collaborative and cooperative learning theories, learning communities have created environments in which student learning is the center of attention. Overtime, the acquisition of knowledge had come to be considered a highly social process in which construction occurs interdependently between students and teachers (Cross, 1998).

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This article is from The Journal of Technology Studies, 33, no. 2 (Spring 2007): 73–78.

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Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2007
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