Dumb and dumber: Stereotype perceptions at the intersection of race and athletic status

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2018-01-01
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Erdman, Caitlin
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Patrick Armstrong
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Psychology
The Department of Psychology may prepare students with a liberal study, or for work in academia or professional education for law or health-services. Graduates will be able to apply the scientific method to human behavior and mental processes, as well as have ample knowledge of psychological theory and method.
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In this study, lists of traits typically associated with several groups of students were created using empirically supported methods. Specifically, these traits were grouped into a taxonomy based on the extent to which they were classified as being stereotypical for Black student-athletes, White student-athletes, Black non-athlete students, White non-athlete students, Black individuals, White individuals, athletes, and non-athletes. The purpose behind this study was to create lists of stereotypes associated with the above categories to address the methodological limitations of measures used previous research in sport psychology stereotypes. Results obtained using intraclass correlation measures of interrater agreement, chi-square and contingency coefficient analyses of forced-choice card sort data, and reliability analyses of stereotype ratings indicated support for a stereotype taxonomy encompassing each of these distinct groups. Additionally, the psychometrically based methods used in this study could provide a template for categorizing trait-adjectives about specific groups in more reliable and valid ways in many areas of psychology. The information from this specific study may be useful for future studies when determining applicable stereotypes to use for stereotype threat, perceptions of student-athletes, and perceptions of personality.

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Wed Aug 01 00:00:00 UTC 2018