Examining Gender Roles in Agricultural Decision Making and Household Food Security in Rural Uganda

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2018-05
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Myers, Paige
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Sociology

The Department of Sociology is co-directed by the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. It offers a major in Sociology (giving a liberal-arts education, or a sociological background for work in social-services, law, theology, academia, the government, etc); as well as a major in Public Service and Administration in Agriculture (preparing for work with agricultural agencies or agriculture and natural-resources public services). It also offers the interdepartmental major in Criminology and Criminal Justice.

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The Department of Sociology was formed in 1991 from the division of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology.

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1991 - present

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Abstract
This research was motivated by a desire to understand the ways in which gender is associated with agricultural decision making in rural Uganda. As part of a larger study on smallholder farmers’ decision making about management practices and technologies for increased common bean production and improved soil fertility, this research considers several variables from a 2014 Baseline Survey in rural Uganda involving 302 households. The literature review focused on the role of gender in the cultural context of Uganda, particularly women’s roles in agricultural decision-making. Statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS. Analysis of several agricultural decision areas demonstrated the extent of women’s involvement in decision making. Husbands were more likely to be responsible for land purchasing or rental decisions, and use of income, while wives were more likely to make decisions about which varieties to plant and post-harvest practices (saving beans for eating and for seed. Analysis will also examine variations whether household food security is associated with women’s decision-making roles.
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