Isolation and characterization of polymorphic microsatellite loci in the boll weevil, Anthonomus grandis Boheman (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

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2004-12-01
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Kim, Kyung
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Sappington, Thomas
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Entomology

The Department of Entomology seeks to teach the study of insects, their life-cycles, and the practicalities in dealing with them, for use in the fields of business, industry, education, and public health. The study of entomology can be applied towards evolution and ecological sciences, and insects’ relationships with other organisms & humans, or towards an agricultural or horticultural focus, focusing more on pest-control and management.

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The Department of Entomology was founded in 1975 as a result of the division of the Department of Zoology and Entomology.

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The boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis Boheman) is a major insect pest of cotton in North America. Dispersal activity poses a threat to ongoing eradication efforts in the US, but little is known about the frequency of long-distance migration. Nuclear molecular markers are needed to assess gene flow in relation to geographical distance. A biotin-enrichment strategy was employed to develop microsatellite markers for the boll weevil. Of 23 loci isolated, 14 were polymorphic with three to 10 alleles per locus. Twelve of the polymorphic loci showed Mendelian inheritance and are likely to be useful in population genetics studies.

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This article is from Molecular Ecology Notes 4 (2004): 701, doi:10.1111/j.1471-8286.2004.00765.x.

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