Cain in early nineteenth-century literature: Traditional biblical stories revised to encompass contemporary advances in science

Thumbnail Image
Date
2012-01-01
Authors
Davis, Kara
Major Professor
Advisor
Dometa Brothers
Committee Member
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Altmetrics
Authors
Research Projects
Organizational Units
Organizational Unit
English

The Department of English seeks to provide all university students with the skills of effective communication and critical thinking, as well as imparting knowledge of literature, creative writing, linguistics, speech and technical communication to students within and outside of the department.

History
The Department of English and Speech was formed in 1939 from the merger of the Department of English and the Department of Public Speaking. In 1971 its name changed to the Department of English.

Dates of Existence
1939-present

Historical Names

  • Department of English and Speech (1939-1971)

Related Units

Journal Issue
Is Version Of
Versions
Series
Department
Abstract

During the early nineteenth-century, a number of authors sought to revise the traditional story of Cain, frequently using non-canonical sources to complete these revisions. The plethora of texts which work to revise this biblical tradition in Romantic Literature certainly makes the modern day reader wonder what caused this apparently widespread impulse. This issue becomes especially curious when considering the diverse authors who undertook the task of revising the story of Cain. In this critical analysis, I examine three different revisions of Cain by authors George Gordon, Lord Byron, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, and Percy Bysshe Shelley to understand what makes the story of Cain so enticing to these authors, and how Cain might hold themes that the authors use to understand the intersections of religion and science in contemporary England.

Comments
Description
Keywords
Citation
Source
Copyright
Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2012