Examining technical reports from Kolin and Kolin's Models for Technical Writing using Kenneth Burke's Pentad

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1986
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Higgins, Jeffrey
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English

The Department of English seeks to provide all university students with the skills of effective communication and critical thinking, as well as imparting knowledge of literature, creative writing, linguistics, speech and technical communication to students within and outside of the department.

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The Department of English and Speech was formed in 1939 from the merger of the Department of English and the Department of Public Speaking. In 1971 its name changed to the Department of English.

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1939-present

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  • Department of English and Speech (1939-1971)

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It has been over forty years since Kenneth Burke created the Dramatistic Pentad as a tool for examining literary form. In that time, the pentad has proven to be a useful and versatile instrument in the fields of communication, education, composition, and, of course, literary analysis. An illustration of this versatility is the fact that the pentad has been applied to all these fields just over the past fourteen years. In 1972, David Ling used the pentad to uncover motives behind the rhetorical construction of Senator Edward Kennedy's address on the death 1 of Mary Jo Kopechne. Joseph Comprone, in 1978, suggested the pentad as a heuristic tool for freshman composition students and teachers. In 1983, Jeffrey Nelson wrote about the pentad's use as a tool for basic speech students "to provide them with a better theoretical base for understanding communication." And three years later in March of 1986, Richard Coe used the pentad to write a literary analysis of Brom Stoker's Dracula.

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Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 1986