The Effects of Bovine Growth Hormone (bGH) on Dairy Farm Profitability by Type of Government Program

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1987-07-01
Authors
Shin, Seung
Kliebenstein, James
Belyea, Ronald
Bennett, Myron
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Economics

The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 to teach economic theory as a truth of industrial life, and was very much concerned with applying economics to business and industry, particularly agriculture. Between 1910 and 1967 it showed the growing influence of other social studies, such as sociology, history, and political science. Today it encompasses the majors of Agricultural Business (preparing for agricultural finance and management), Business Economics, and Economics (for advanced studies in business or economics or for careers in financing, management, insurance, etc).

History
The Department of Economic Science was founded in 1898 under the Division of Industrial Science (later College of Liberal Arts and Sciences); it became co-directed by the Division of Agriculture in 1919. In 1910 it became the Department of Economics and Political Science. In 1913 it became the Department of Applied Economics and Social Science; in 1924 it became the Department of Economics, History, and Sociology; in 1931 it became the Department of Economics and Sociology. In 1967 it became the Department of Economics, and in 2007 it became co-directed by the Colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Business.

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1898–present

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  • Department of Economic Science (1898–1910)
  • Department of Economics and Political Science (1910-1913)
  • Department of Applied Economics and Social Science (1913–1924)
  • Department of Economics, History and Sociology (1924–1931)
  • Department of Economics and Sociology (1931–1967)

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Administration of Bovine Growth Hormone (bGH) to dairy cows has been shown to increase milk production. Injecting milk cows with bGH results in increased milk production per cow from 10 to 40 percent (Kalter et al.). This response is rapid and continues as long as treatment is given. Presently, the injection is daily, but research is ongoing to develop implants to eliminate this tedious and laborious approach. Some feel that bGH will be available for commercial use within two or three years. It is now in the testing stage for Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval,

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