Third space sites, subjectivities and discourses: reimagining the representational potentials of (b)orderlands' rhetorics

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2005-01-01
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Licona, Adela
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Carl Herndl
Diane Price Herndl
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English

The Department of English seeks to provide all university students with the skills of effective communication and critical thinking, as well as imparting knowledge of literature, creative writing, linguistics, speech and technical communication to students within and outside of the department.

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The Department of English and Speech was formed in 1939 from the merger of the Department of English and the Department of Public Speaking. In 1971 its name changed to the Department of English.

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1939-present

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  • Department of English and Speech (1939-1971)

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Abstract

This dissertation identifies feminist third-space (both/and) consciousness in academic and non-academic contexts. Although dissimilar, both academic discourses and zines (self-published magazines) are comprised of complex rhetorical performances with implications for feminist practices of representation and the re-production of meaning. This dissertation analyzes academic third-space sites resulting from the crossing of disciplinary borders and activist zines as examples of nonacademic third space, with particular emphasis on representations of bodies and sexualities. Zines reveal (1) the transformative potentials beyond gender binaries; (2) the importance of revisioning histories; (3) the practices of what I term "reverso" (critical reversals of the normative gaze); (4) the deployment of "(e)motion" as embodied resistance; (5) the emergence of a coalitional consciousness and practices of articulation that have the potential to interrupt and reconfigure consumption patterns; and (6) the creation and mobilization of communities for social justice.

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Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2005