The Innate Immune System of the Perinatal Lung and Responses to Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

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2013-09-01
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Derscheid, Rachel
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Ackermann, Mark
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Veterinary Pathology
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Abstract

The response of the preterm and newborn lung to airborne pathogens, particles, and other insults is initially dependent on innate immune responses since adaptive responses may not fully mature and require weeks for sufficient responses to antigenic stimuli. Foreign material and microbial agents trigger soluble, cell surface, and cytoplasmic receptors that activate signaling cascades that invoke release of surfactant proteins, defensins, interferons, lactoferrin, oxidative products, and other innate immune substances that have antimicrobial activity, which can also influence adaptive responses. For viral infections such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), the pulmonary innate immune responses has an essential role in defense as there are no fully effective vaccines or therapies for RSV infections of humans and reinfections are common. Understanding the innate immune response by the preterm and newborn lung may lead to preventive strategies and more effective therapeutic regimens.

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This is an author's accepted manuscript of an article from Veterinary Pathology 50 (2013): 827–841, doi:10.1177/0300985813480216. Posted with permission.

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Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 UTC 2013
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